Bing

He was born in Germany and composed many works of classical music. He graduated from medical school twice. He worked with Charles Lindburgh. And he started a Cardiac Catheterization program at the hospital where heart surgery was born. Not only did Dr. Richard Bing see history being made, he helped make it.

Hired in 1942 as an instructor in the Johns Hopkins University Department of Medicine, Bing traveled from New York to his new job in Baltimore. Crossing the Chesapeake Bay on a ferry, Bing noted no less than six people with Cyanosis. Their destination, he surmised, was probably the hospital. It was two years before Blalock and Taussig would attempt the first Congenital Heart Surgery, but Johns Hopkins already had a reputation. If your child has a bad heart, it was said, get them to Hopkins.

There wasn’t much at all that could be done, but Dr. Helen Taussig knew almost everything there was to know about the human heart. Taussig was a huge believer in research, and would spend hours examining defective hearts. Despite her best efforts – she often asked the parents of her deceased patients for permission to dissect the heart, and spent hours studying them in her lab – there was very little progress being made. Even after the first heart operation, very little was known. There was ONE operation, and it was designed to help relive only ONE defect. Everyone else was still out in the cold.

By 1945  Dr. Alfred Blalock asked Bing to set up a Cardiac Catheterization unit at the hospital. Dr. Helen Taussig, who had already been eyeing him suspiciously, hit the roof. Dr. Bing explained their constant disagreements:

She was very jealous and guarded her territory; she considered the sick children as her own, having no family herself. She was also deaf, which increased her suspicion of the world beyond.

(That link contains not only a good description of Taussig-Bing Anomaly, but an in-depth look at Johns Hopkins Hospital during the Blalock-Bing-Taussig years. I highly recommend reading it!)

Dr. Bing eventually left Johns Hopkins, continuing to do major research in the Cath Lab. While at Wayne State University he did some of the early work involving PET scans, using computers belonging to Ford Motor Company to run the scanner.

Dr. Bing retired and now lives comfortably in California, and last year celebrated his 100th birthday!

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