Ask Questions!

Here’s a scary report, courtesy of Kevin, MD: Patients don’t ask questions of their doctors.

While there are a precious few patients who are totally involved in their health care, the vast majority just take their doctor’s advice at face value. A 2008 study found that when 181 people were prescribed a new medication, they asked a total of 199 questions (or made a comment) about the new drug. That’s an average of 1.09 questions/comments per patient!

What’s worse, the same study showed that the doctors didn’t talk, either. The average office visit was 15.9 minutes, and the patient and doctor spent an average of 49 seconds discussing the medication. The length of discussion ranged from a high of 351 seconds (5.85 minutes) to an amazing 1.9 seconds! (What can you say in 1.9 seconds?!?!)

As noted before, patients who are more involved in their own health care ask more questions. That’s you. Having a Congenital Heart Defect means that you are, for all intents and purposes, a patient pool of ONE. Others may have the same defect that you do, but no CHD ever treats its owner like everyone else.

As I’ve written before, I have a hernia. It’s usually well-behaved, but occasionally it will get pretty angry with me. A hernia repair is a fairly simple operation these days, and usually doesn’t even require an overnight stay… except for me. My Cardiologist does not want to authorize the operation, instead asking me to just fight through the bad times by prescribing couch time and TV. “I could spend a day explaining your anatomy to the surgical team,” he has said. “And they still wouldn’t understand it.” It’s not that he can’t, my doc has a couple of teaching awards to his credit. I’m complicated.

So if you don’t know what’s going on with your body, it is time to learn. And ask questions – what is this medicine supposed to do? What are some of the side effects? What do you think would happen if I decided not to take this drug? Are there any other options available? All of these are legitimate questions – and if your doctor gives you an answer in 1.9 seconds, ask another question. You can control how long he talks to you. Conversely, you can find a doctor who will spend the time needed to help you make a good decision.

It’s your body, and the medical decisions you make affect you, and rarely anyone else.

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