Five CHD Questions: Why?

Why are Congenital Heart Defects (CHDs) the least understood and the least funded of all the birth defects?

Despite being the birth defect with the highest rate of incidence, Congenital Heart Defects receive the least funding for research. One would think that this would be the target of massive funding, intense awareness campaigns, and major research allocations, but that is not so. In fact, it is one of the lowest.

CHDs is an “invisible disability” – we hide in plain sight. Other disabilities and illnesses have obvious signs, but the average CHDer can usually blend into a crowd with little trouble. Most of the time this is a good thing; I personally don’t prefer to stand out. One thing I write about on this blog and occasionally mention in a presentation is look at me – see how normal I am! But that also works against us as we can become lost in the shuffle.

When I was born there was no such thing as pre-natal testing; I was born on a Tuesday but it was Friday before my mother realized that there was probably something seriously wrong with me. Even today, a Fetal Echocardiogram is not standard procedure: an expectant mother normally receives this test only if her family has a history of heart defects or other factors come into play.

Despite what you may hear or read on the internet, CHDs are more survivable today than at any time in the past. A minimum of 90% of all children in the United States who undergo heart surgery survive to adulthood. And every year, the odds tilt more and more in our favor. There are currently about one million adults living with a Heart Defect and about 800,000 children.

With almost two million people living with a CHD, we’ve become our own little world. Survivors represent every gender, every race, and every age group. This diversity has led to advocacy groups of all types, such as the Adult Congenital Heart Association (ACHA), Hypoplastic Right Hearts (HRH), and Broken Hearts of the Big Bend. Every Survivor/Advocacy group serves a segment of our community and each one fills a need.

The members of the Congenital Heart Defect community are many and varied. But the one thing all segments of the CHD family needs is more awareness and better research. Because the goal of every Survivor/Advocacy group is to cease operations  because there is no need for their services anymore.

We’ll get there one day;

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