Don’t trust me

Google Alerts is pretty cool. I can set up a search for a phrase, and whenever Google Alerts finds that phrase on a new (to them) webpage it will send me a link to it. I have several Google Alerts, and one of them searches for the phrase “Congenital Heart Disease”.

I got a link from Google Alerts over the weekend that almost caused me to jump through the roof. I’m not going to give you a link – no need for this idiot to exist, much less get a link from me – but I will quote from his webpage:

Some of our friends/patients have congenital heart disease, meaning genetically they have high cholesterol despite avid exercise, diet, and supplements. However, for those of us who may not have a specific history of heart disease, yet want to prevent it , we should consider what is best for us to do – regardless of our family history. It’s not all about fat and salt, contrary to public opinion and the words of associations such as the American Heart Association.

SAY WHAT? I’ve been living with a heart defect for 43 years and writing this blog for two years. No one has ever said to me (and I have never found in any research) that Congenital Heart Disease causes high cholesterol. But wait, it gets even better!

However, speaking of salt, most people are sodium deficient. There is absolutely nothing wrong (and it actually should be encouraged) with adding salt during your cooking.

WHOA! Anyone been following the news lately? Salt isn’t your friend – especially if you have Congestive Heart Failure (CHF).

You could shake your head and say that the writer just doesn’t know the facts. But that’s not it. A little further down the page, our writer provides the answer to all your health concerns:

You’d be amazed at how a diet and lifestyle change can get you off cholesterol-lowering and high blood pressure medications. Adding natural nutriceuticals/supplements can add even more help.  If you have never received (our services), give us a call at (XXX) XXX XXXX. We would love to help you get on the road to eating healthy for life.

It seems that he isn’t just incorrect, he’s intentionally misleading you in order to sell his product. Here’s the truth of the matter: If you try to “cure” or control a Congenital Heart Defect with a diet plan or nutritional supplements alone, you will die. It can’t be done – heart defects require constant attention and lifelong care. Even those of us with a “simple” Atrial Septal Defect are recommended to get a periodic Cardiology exam.

So here’s what I want you to do – don’t trust me. Assume that I am just some idiot with a keyboard and an Internet connection. Obviously you have a computer; Google your CHD and look up the research for yourself. Learn how to read it (not so hard these days, you can just Google what you don’t understand) and learn, learn, learn! Talk to your doctor at length, pick his/her brain for all the information you can find. Ask questions. Take the answers and use them to think of even more questions to ask.

Remember that the person who is going to be most affected by your health is… you. The doctor is looking out for you, but at the same time, he has other patients to worry about. You probably aren’t in the forefront of their mind. So learn all you can about your health, and get involved in your own care. Take a hands-on approach.

It’s your body, learn how it works and how to take care of it!

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5 Responses to “Don’t trust me”

  1. Erock Says:

    …and clearly, make sure whatever websites you’re getting your information from are legitimately medical. Make sure what you consult *quality* sources that are *appropriate* to your condition.

  2. Craig Says:

    Could I add to this and urge a little caution when dealing with people online that claim to have a heart condition. Most are genuine, however a few are ….. unhinged …. I have no idea why someone would claim to have CHD when they don’t but I have come across it.

    • Steve Says:

      I never have come across anyone pretending to have a heart defect, but I have been told by the President of the Adult Congenital Heart Association that it happens. She was at a loss as to why someone would fake having a CHD, too.

    • Anonymous Says:

      Munchausen syndrome. That’s a whole other site.

  3. Kristine Says:

    So true. Each heart is unique. Each road is different. But, some stuff is just junk! Wow. And, as for the fakers, I’ve battled people pretending to have dead kids! That’s just the internet at it’s worst. Keep putting in that due diligence. You’ve garnered a reputation for solid fact-based reporting.

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