Tougher than a salt shaker!

Remember: Grand Rounds hosted on Adventures of a Funky Heart! June 15, 2010! Entry guidelines are HERE.

I hate salt.

Actually, I love a little salt; but salt doesn’t like me. I have Congestive Heart Failure (CHF), which is caused when the heart muscle weakens to the point that it has difficulty pushing the blood through the body.¬† Think of it like this: You buy a red rubber ball. Day after day you bounce your rubber ball – against the floor, toss it against the wall, ricochet it off the ceiling (I’m assuming you live in a house with unbreakable furniture!) and your rubber ball always works as designed. It always bounces just as high and just as well as the day you bought it. That rubber ball represents a normal heart.

Now imagine that you buy a red rubber ball and bounce it all day long. But as time passes, the ball doesn’t bounce as high as it once did. Either through some flaw in the manufacturing or a flaw in the rubber itself, your ball begins to lose its “bounce” and soon you have to toss the ball twice as hard to get it to bounce as high as it once did. That rubber ball represents a heart going through Heart Failure.

Since your heart can’t pump blood as well as it once did, you have to help it any way you can. One of the ways you help is to go on (and follow!) the diet plan. The diet has two rules: Consume no more than 2000 milligrams of sodium per day, and consume no more than 2000 milliliters of liquid per day. The 2000 milliliters of liquid isn’t that difficult to comply with – that’s a two liter bottle full of liquid per day. I have friends who drink a lot of water, especially when it is hot, and they may find it difficult to keep their consumption to under two liters per day, but for most of us it is not a problem. The problem is the 2000 milligrams of sodium.

How much is 2000 milligrams? A packet of Sweet’n Low contains 1 gram (1000 milligrams). So open up two packets of Sweet’N Low and pour the contents out on your counter. That’s how much sodium you are allowed per day.

You can cry now, I’ll certainly understand!

But you need to follow the diet plan that you doctor give you (your plan may not exactly be 2000 milliliters/2000 milligrams, it will be what your doctor feels is best for you) because you need to have to get the excess fluid out of you. Fluid makes you weigh more, and your heart has to work harder to get your blood through your body. Every pound you can lose helps your heart do its job better. So tighten up, we’re gonna fight this thing.

When you go to the store you are going to learn how to read a nutritional label. For the CHF diet, you are interested in two things: Serving size and sodium content. Both are clearly marked. Be careful – a common strategy to reduce the numbers is to reduce the portion size! So double-check that – can you really limit yourself to 2 ounces of chocolate? (My answer is “No!”)

You will find that many processed meats are no longer your friend. Soups don’t pass the sodium test very easily, either. And when labels brag about how they contain Sea Salt, your response should be “So what?” Sea Salt, Regular Salt, Moon Salt – they all contain sodium!

There are many salt substitutes available; Mrs. Dash is popular. I am not a fan of Mrs. Dash, but that’s just personal. it doesn’t appeal to me, but if you like it, enjoy it. You have to be careful with your salt substitutes – some of them replace the sodium with a little extra sugar, and some of them drop the Sodium Chloride in favor of Potassium Chloride. Some medications don’t mix well with Potassium, so read the label. I use Benson’s Gourmet Seasonings – it tastes really good, I recommend Table Tasty, their salt substitute, and Bravado, their chili seasoning. (And I’m not getting anything from Benson’s if you order, I’m just telling you what I like. You may find something else that appeals to you!)

CHF patients also need to monitor their weight. The best way to do this is after getting up in the morning, go to the bathroom and then weigh yourself. Do this before you shower or get dressed. When you are done, write your weight down and keep track of it day by day. If your weight goes up more than three pounds in a 24 hour period without an explination (birthday party, for example) call your doctor – you probably need a medication adjustment. Most likely you’ll be told to take an extra dose of diuretics (water pills) but the doctor may ask you to come by his/her office. Weight gain is usually a sign of fluid retention, and you already know that is not good for someone dealing with heart failure.

Fighting CHF will not be easy, especially at first when you are trying to get used to the new diet plan. But you can tough it out. After all, you are stronger than a little salt shaker, aren’t you?

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One Response to “Tougher than a salt shaker!”

  1. Barbara Huckabee Says:

    Thank you so much for sending me this info. Steve. My sister Josie in Kentucky, has this very heart also, and she said after a while you get so that you don’t miss the salt. She also is diabetic, which adds to her bad heart….I try to tell Paul that, but he will not listen to me. He has had two stents put in his upper heart and he is still eating anything he wants! He eats red meats with all the fat on it. All the salt he wants and, I am very ill with his doctor for not getting this info in his head so he won’t end up back in the hospital with more stents or just drops over out in the field on the tractor, while farming! He almost had a heat stroke last year, because he was not getting enough fluids!!!!!Thank you Steve!
    thi

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