Traditions

One of my earliest memories is getting up very early in the morning and loading into the car for the long drive to see the doctors at Johns Hopkins. My parents were younger back then; with a little luck we could make the trip in one day. Just about sunrise we’d encounter a Stuckey’s Restaurant close to the North Carolina – Virgina state line. That was where we always stopped for breakfast, and the light blue roof became one of our landmarks. I looked forward to the restaurant, and the folks did too. Then one day…

…. one day, we came around the corner to find our favorite restaurant was now a pile of ashes! The only thing left, somehow, was the roof. It was pretty much intact, as if someone or something had gently removed it and set it aside before the restaurant burned, then returned it to its proper place.

Well, that’s not good. So we found breakfast somewhere else, and didn’t think anything about it until we got to Hopkins. There, we found out that my Cardiologist – arguably the best Cardiologist in the world – had left. Dr. Richard Rowe was now Head of Cardiology at a hospital in Canada.

No Stuckey’s, no doctor… these two events must be connected in some way, correct? And by the way, I am not superstitious!

I wear a pair of lucky socks whenever I have a doctor’s appointment. One day they’ll wear out, and I’ll rescue them from the trashcan. If I have to cut a small section out of the toe and stick it in my pocket, I will.

Why? At one appointment my doc looked at the EKG and his eyebrows shot up. That is never a good sign.

“You’ve developed an Atrial Fibrillation since your last appointment,” he said. Not good – A-Fib can lead to fainting or a stroke. And I was already taking Amiodarone to combat A-Fib, so apparently the Fibrillation had broken through.

“Double your Amiodarone and have an EKG test in two weeks. Have them fax us a copy. You may eventually have to have an ablation to try to knock that A-Fib down.”

Ablation – a catheter maneuvered inside of the heart with a probe on the end, designed to burn away the areas causing the out of sync heartbeats. Wonderful.

So two weeks passed, and I had the EKG done and faxed. Naturally, the EKG tech won’t even tell you the time of day, no matter how much you beg. But I got my answer that evening, when they called and told me I needed to come to the hospital for an appointment with the Electrophysiologist.

So the next week I was back, being examined by the specialist – wearing a new pair of socks. Didn’t bring that pair intentionally, just needed an extra pair and tossed them into my carry bag.

The doc hooked me up to a 12 lead EKG (the first one I had ever seen), listened with his stethoscope, and asked me several questions.

“So, how do you feel?”

“Worried about what you are going to find, but other than that, pretty good.”

“Tell me how you feel when you are having an episode.”

“Actually Doc, I can’t tell you. I don’t feel them.”

“Not at all?”

“No sir.”

He put the stethoscope back on my chest. “You are in A-Fib right now. Do you feel any different? Anything at all?”

“No sir,” I said.

He listened some more, and run another EKG. “I’m going to discuss this with your Cardiologist,” he said as he excused himself from the room.

In a few minutes he was back. “Since you don’t even feel it, and it doesn’t seem to be bothering you, I’m going to discontinue the Amiodarone. Get an EKG faxed to my office in two weeks. And if you feel light headed or more tired than usual, call me ASAP. But if it doesn’t bother you, I’m not going to medicate you for it.”

And with that we were out the door. The two-week EKG was acceptable and I felt fine, so all he told me to do was to discontinue the medication and come back for a routine checkup in one year. And ever since then, I walk into a doctor’s office wearing my lucky socks.

But I’m not superstitious…. what makes you think that? šŸ™‚

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