Dabigatran approved!

For the first time in nearly 50 years, patients with Atrial Fibrillation (A-Fib) have a new blood thinning option: Dabigatran. The talk is already starting about how this could replace Warfarin (which is really RAT POISON… we’re just given it in doses too small to kill us!)

One can hope, but there is still a lot that we need to learn about the drug. The US Food and Drug Administration has approved it only as a preventive for stroke caused by A-Fib. Will it even work for anything else? The odds are that it will, but it still needs to be tested. How are people with mechanical valves going to react to it? Somebody’s going to have to take a deep breath and test it. Yet another problem is the cost. Dabigatran is estimated to cost $8 to $12 per day; Warfarin has been around so long that the cost is a pittance. But that is just the cost of the drug – with Warfarin, you also get the required monitoring, in the form of the INR Test. Dabigatran doesn’t require monitoring. Does the cost of Warfarin plus the cost of the test plus supplies make its cost roughly equal with Dabigatran?

There’s another major drawback for certain CHDers: Dabigtran is currently not recommended for “patients with the presence of a severe heart-valve disorder.” That sounds like Tricuspid Atresia patients, Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome patients, and those with several other defects are out of luck. Perhaps it is not for us because of lack of testing; if that is the case, the recommendation may change in the future.

At the moment, Dabigatran looks like a drug with a limited potential. Hopefully real world experience will change this.

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