Posts Tagged ‘care’

What you need in a hospital

September 16, 2010

In an earlier post I discussed what we need in a Congenital Heart Surgeon. Reader Heather let the cat out of the bag by mentioning that wasn’t all you needed… you need a good hospital, too.

How true, how true. As I have said many times before, the doctor you need does not practice in a town of 5,000 people. There aren’t enough patients in the community to allow him or her to sharpen their skills. Skill partially depends on volume – you do something often, you do it right, and you evaluate your results (and you keep evaluating them, constantly). That’s the only way to improve. You learn from someone who is experienced, then you do it yourself, knowing that anything less than 100% is unacceptable. As you gain skill, you learn how to do it better and faster.

That same fact applies to the hospital. You can have the best surgeon that ever put on a mask; but if the hospital you are in has very little experience with caring for post surgical patients, there could be problems. That applies to the type of surgery you are having, not to all surgeries. Caring for someone who just had heart bypass surgery and someone who just had congenital heart surgery is a lot different. Studies prove that the more experience a facility has, the better the outcome.

I love my community hospital. We have about 150 beds and I’m on a first name basis with a lot of the people there. I know the doctors and the nurses not only from the hospital, but I see them in the community. I saw one of my favorite nurses in the grocery store just last week. But that doesn’t mean I’m going to let them do heart surgery on me – they don’t have the skills. They are well-meaning people and I am sure they would do their best, but if I had surgery there, I’d probably come home in a box. We can’t have that, I’m claustrophobic!

A few months ago there was a plan being considered by England’s National Health Service to consolidate the number of Pediatric Heart Hospitals. A good number of people were understandably upset but the reasoning is logical: some of the units performed a relatively small number of surgeries. Consolidating the number of centers may make it inconvenient for some, but it will make the overall results better.

For us here in the States, that probably means a trip to a large city hospital. There are exceptions – Durham, North Carolina¬† (the home of Duke University Hospitals) is fairly small and Rochester, Minnesota (Home of the Mayo Clinic) is also a small city. But in most cases, we’re heading to The Big City – New York, Los Angeles, Nashville, Boston, Birmingham, Kansas City, Denver, Atlanta. These are only some of the destinations whenever the Heart Warriors I know head to the doctor. “Medical Tourism” is all the rage right now, but to us its old news. The average Heart Warrior is also a Road Warrior; we’ll go to where the best hospitals and doctors are.

And in the words of that great philosopher, Bruce Hornsby – That’s just the way it is.