Posts Tagged ‘Educate’

A Chance to Teach

October 10, 2008

One of the fun things that happens is when I have a chance to teach others about heart defects. Not just the Social Security Administration policy conference in Baltimore two weeks ago that I attended¬† on behalf of the Adult Congenital Heart Association (ACHA), but those times when the situation just presents itself. My friends who teach might very well call it a “teachable moment”, I just say it is a chance to show people how normal I – and many others with heart defects – are.

One such opportunity arose while I was returning from Baltimore. It occurred while I was clearing security through the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) checkpoint. When I reached the front of the line, I told the first screener that I had a pacemaker and requested a hand search. I was asked to step to the side and wait for another TSA agent to assist me.

In a moment the second agent ran my carry-on through the x-ray machine, then asked me to place my feet shoulder with apart and raise my arms to shoulder level. “Before we begin, is there any unusual items on or about your person that you feel you should tell me about?” (That’s a paraphrase; I don’t recall his exact words.)

“Yes,” I said. “My pacemaker is located on the left side of my abdomen, rather than in my shoulder.”

“I’ve never heard of that before,” he commented.

“It’s just the way my heart works,” I told him, warming to the occasion. “Usually a pacemaker is placed in the shoulder and the leads go down through a blood vessel called the Superior Vena Cava into the heart. (Click HERE for a diagram of the “usual” pacemaker placement) But I’ve had heart surgery and my blood vessels have been moved around. If you go down my Superior Vena Cava, you’ll wind up in my right lung.”

“Wow. You’re a little young to be having heart surgery, aren’t you?”

“I’ve had three; I was born with a heart problem. Had my first surgery right here in Baltimore.”

By that time my pat-down was finished and I was cleared to go. “Are you OK to fly?” the guard asked.

“Oh, yeah,” I said, gathering my stuff. “Most of us with heart defects do pretty well. We have to go slower or take it easy at times, but my life is pretty normal… almost boring, in fact.”

“Boring is good, we like boring around here,” he laughed. “You have a great flight.”

When I get a chance to talk about my heart, it’s not so much that I hope the other person remembers me. I hope that they remember that I’m basically “just a guy” – there’s nothing special about me. Sometimes I have to go slower or figure out a different way of doing things. Every few months I’ve got to go see my doctor. And I have a bucketful of pills that I have to take. But other than that, I blend in well.¬† You can’t find me in a crowd by looking for “the guy with the bum heart.” Even though I’m Cyanotic, you probably can’t tell it. You have to know what you are looking for and even then you could easily miss it. I could very easily be the young man sitting at the next table typing on his laptop.

I’m completely normal.