Posts Tagged ‘exam’

Just in case…

August 26, 2010

I was very pleased – to say the least! – about my exam at the Emory Adult Congenital Heart Center yesterday. An Echocardiogram showed that my Left Ventricle is 6 Millimeters smaller than the original Echo done there in 2002. It was 82 Millimeters across in 2002; it is now 76. And in my case, a shrinking heart is a 100% Official Certified GOOD THING!

If there is trouble in the future, if my PulseOx numbers were to start dropping and I was feeling worn out all the time, there are a few options that we could try to help get me back on an even keel. A couple of them are invasive but do not involve heart surgery… surgery can be a risky (and quite possibly fatal) proposition for me.

First things first, remember that 1) I am not a doctor; I’m just trying to explain it to you as it was explained to me. 2) This applies only to my heart and my health situation. Every heart defect is different, and what works for me may not be such a good thing for you… and vice versa.

The general plan for me would be to increase the blood oxygenation… but when you do that, the heart is naturally going to work harder. The trick is to find a happy balance between a decently high PulseOx and the amount of work that the heart can do. Right now my PulseOx is in the low 80% range and I have that happy balance.

The first option I would have (and all this is way in the future, if at all!) is based on my unusual anatomy. Like many reading, I have the Glenn Shunt. But mine was done in 1967, and is a completely different operation. Let’s review the difference:

The Bi-directional Glenn Shunt, the operation usually performed today: The Superior Vena Cava is cut where it joins the heart and is sewn into the Pulmonary Artery. They usually try to sew it as close to the T formed by the Pulmonary Artery to deliver an equal amount of blood to both lungs.

The Classic Glenn Shunt, performed on me in 1967: The Superior Vena Cava stays where it is. Instead of being cut, it is sewn closed. The right branch of the Pulmonary Artery is cut and sewn into the side of the Superior Vena Cava, which means that all of the blood from the Superior Vena Cava is sent into the right lung.

Now in my case, the Vena Cava wasn’t sewn completely closed. I don’t know if that was an error or if a small opening was left to relieve pressure that got too high, but a small amount of blood gets through the chokepoint and into the Right Atrium. If I were to start having problems they could use a Catheter to plug that small hole. That would cause my PulseOx to climb but shouldn’t increase the heart’s workload too much, and would probably be my best option.

The second thing they could do would be to create a fistula in my right arm. Basically, they would “short-circuit” the circulatory system by connecting an artery directly to a vein. My blood would head down my right arm as usual, but would “turn around” and head back toward the heart before it normally would. (Don’t worry,there are lots of of arterial branches and veins…. my arm wouldn’t rot and fall off!) That would increase the PulseOx numbers… but would also increase the heart’s work load. It is probably my second best option.

The third option would be a combination of medications that could reduce the natural resistance inside my body. Part of the heart’s work comes from how far the blood travels – if you could take all of the blood vessels out of an average human child and place them end to end, you’d have about 60,000 miles of blood vessels! Part of the heart’s work is because of resistance – your blood also has to turn corners and flow through organs (“Scuse me! Comin’ through!”). The medication would “grease” my blood vessels and make the blood flow through them easier. This would cause my PulseOx to rise… but not as much as any other option. My heart would also work harder. With more effort but not as many benefits, this is my third and least attractive option.

But getting a good report now gives me something better than all three of these possibilities: time. Nothing has to be done now, nor for the foreseeable future. And if I do reach the point where something needs to be done, delaying it now means that another option  could be developed that might be even better than the three ideas currently on the table.

All part of the master plan to keep pushing that final day back!

UPDATE: See Heather’s comment below for a good laugh! 🙂  Thanks, Heather!